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Academics

2017 Bancroft Senior Cooperative Projects

In the spring of 2017, as the final semester of their senior year began, students selected their top Co-op choices from more than two dozen organizations throughout Greater Worcester. Each senior completed the program application, was matched with a faculty advisor, and officially placed in their Co-op with a professional mentor. They completed at least 50 to 60 hours of onsite, project-based work, making meaningful contributions throughout the month of May. Finally, they submitted a portfolio of reflections on their Co-op experiences.

Click the names below for highlights of the 2017 Bancroft Senior Co-op experience:

Michael Barshteyn & Taylor Bergman, 15-40 Connection

Their Mentor writes:

“This project was extremely valuable to our organization, especially with our target audience being high school students. Michael and Taylor are professional, talented, receptive to ideas, and very creative. It was great to work with them to see their perspective on our education and develop a tool that we can use to encourage other organizations to adopt our educational programming. We are impressed by the quality of their work, their enthusiasm for the project, and their valuable input throughout this process.”

“They were able to transition our description of our vision into a great visual representation of what we do that is engaging and exciting without being overwhelming.”

VIEW THEIR VIDEO HERE.

Kelly Borg, UMass Medical, Orthopedics

Her Mentor writes:

“Having Kelly join our team provided the opportunity for us to share our work with some interested in the healthcare field.” In addition, another member of the team reports: “she is very outgoing, personable, and happy to take on whatever tasks we ask her to do.  I’m very glad to have her help”

Kelly writes:

“I loved being a part of the FORCE-TJR team because the model they’re creating to improve the healthcare between a patient and a doctor, as well as the patients’ lives, is something that won’t only be used with total joint replacement but will hopefully become something more widespread in the healthcare world.”

VIEW HER ENTIRE REFLECTION

Jacob Freedman & Spencer Tretter, Greater Worcester Land Trust, Wildlife Exploration

We have been absolutely thrilled and thankful for the students from Bancroft that have helped us throughout the years.

Their Mentor writes: 

Jacob & Spencer,

Your write up and field analysis is simply dumbfoundingly awesome! I am in awe of what you guys did out there. Those forest plots are real work, and you did a great job with them. The wildlife you photographed is much more charismatic than I would have given it credit for. Congratulations! Thank you! And count me DANG impressed!

Yours in the Forest,
Colin

VIEW THEIR FINDINGS IN “THE TREE OF LIFE”


Shanez’e Johnson, Worcester Partnership

Her Mentor, Mr. A, writes:

“A specific project (Golf Outing) was in the planning for May 22 but had to be rescheduled in July. The fruits of this project will not be realized until early August. The preparation for the arrival of the students was also a major plus. Schedules for faculty, staff, and students were initiated during her stay. In addition, she attended two meetings which are essential to the functioning of the program. Year 15 starts on June 26, 2017.”

“Having known the student from the age of six, I have witnessed the growth of a person who has become an intelligent, well spoken, respected young lady who has grown in leaps and bounds to become a special member of the Bancroft Community.”

Shanez'e writes:

“As a graduate of the program, I return and volunteer each summer to work with the children, and see flashes of my younger self in them.”

VIEW HER REFLECTION

Lydia Mason, Mass Audubon – Wachusett Meadow, Nature Education

Her Mentor writes:

“Bancroft interns are always very mature, confident, and able to do work that helps our organization. Bancroft interns actually help (rather than require a lot of work on our part.) It’s great!

Lydia provided youthful energy and another set of hands and eyes to assist in the preschool room. Students were given extra attention and supervision. Young children often relate quickly to a person closer to their age. With all this help, we were able to achieve our goals in the nature preschool classroom.” 

"The children just gravitate to her.  She has an eye for noticing things and jumping in when something needs to be done."

VIEW HER VIDEO REFLECTION HERE

Other Highlights of the 2017 Senior Co-op

Sarah Baker & Paris Jensen, Mass Audubon – Broad Meadow Brook, Rain Garden

Paris reflects: “To be wholly serious for a moment, I am extremely grateful for the chance to spend the final month of my senior year doing meaningful work like this. It is immensely satisfying to be combatting a current global issue like pollution, especially to do so by gardening, which I love, at Broad Meadow Brook, where I was a camper as a kid and which I have a great deal of respect for as an institution. It’s wonderful to see the renovations they’ve made since I was small, and satisfying to contribute to them. I also enjoy the work on a more personal scale as a way to reconnect with the part of myself that loves nature and the outdoors – the part of me that calls spiders fella and stalks swallowtail butterflies. It is a joy to be working towards a meaningful goal, even if it is a physically demanding one – and a fulfilling wrap for my last year of high school.”

VIEW THEIR DIGITAL REFLECTION


Emmanuel Bangandozou, Bethany Gove, & Sally Yuan, The Y – Greendale Branch, Event Planning

VIEW A VIDEO MONTAGE OF THEIR PROJECT


Tiana Brote & Samantha Petter, Latino Education Institute

Sam reflects: “On a personal level, however, working with LHP has reminded me why I fell in love with Spanish in the first place. By applying the skills I had learned in the sterile environment of academia to the real world, I realized the true capacity of language to connect a community of otherwise distant people. Among the Latinos of Worcester, one could draw thousands of divisions based on national origin, social status, occupation, political views, and more. However, the reason Worcester’s Latino community has solidified into the cultural “tossed salad” that it has comes from the shared lingual background in an overwhelmingly Anglophone society. This connection is vital to the way in which we study cultural exchanges in an urban environment, for as prominent community activist José Peres said, language barriers can often lead to the conclusion that “a language that we do not need to understand means that we cannot participate or have a voice in major issues.” ... This experience demonstrated to me the importance of providing support to English Language Learners (ELLs) in the public school systems and has hardened my resolve to obtain a teaching certificate in college in order to become an ESL tutor.”

Tiana reflects: “The LEI has an immense impact on the greater Worcester community. The bilingual program in Worcester public schools was defunded in the 1990’s. This left many children in a difficult position, as they lost support from a service that was previously guaranteed and were forced to either adapt or fall behind. The LEI is an organization that works to assist the Latino children of Worcester in whatever way possible. A community that was disregarded when it came to funding, Latinos have been able to find support in this nonprofit. The LEI is crucial to the spirit of the Latino community in Worcester, as it represents hope and resilience for children learning their place in a new country.”

VIEW A DRAMATIZATION OF THEIR INTERVIEWS FOR THE LATINO HISTORY PROJECT

VIEW A WEBSITE THEY CREATED OF A GALLERY OF THEIR INTERVIEWS

VIEW A FLYER FOR AN UPCOMING EVENT


Maeve Buckley, The Y – Greendale Branch, Marketing

Her Mentor writes: “We now have a usable tennis camp video that we can use to market and promote tennis camp.”

VIEW THE TENNIS CAMP VIDEO


Cameron Call & Ben Salfeld, City of Worcester Manager’s Office

Cameron explains: “In my Co-op, I was working in the City Manager’s office for Worcester under the direction of Che Anderson. I was assigned to the Event Passport project, an initiative to encourage municipal employees to engage with organizations and communities within Worcester. Essentially, each employee is given a passport which they get stamped upon attending an event hosted by a participating organization. Upon receiving ten stamps, the employee will be entered into a raffle as an incentive to participate.”

VIEW THE EVENT PASSPORT OVERVIEW

VIEW BEN’S REFLECTIONS


Eric Chang, Greater Worcester Land Trust, Dog Parks

Eric’s work is incredibly helpful to GWLT and, potentially to the City Parks Department.  With the development of a couple dog parks in the City, the brochure Eric created can be a helpful document to provide at each of the new dog parks.  If anything, it serves as an awesome first draft of a document that will likely be available to users of those two parks.  It serves to educate dog owners on historic and current dog legislation in Worcester, as well as educating the public about proper dog etiquette.

VIEW HIS DRAFT OF THE BROCHURE


Christina Cimini, Zaria Li & Carlos Ma, Bancroft School, Monarch Butterfly Waystation

VIEW THEIR REFLECTIONS ON THEIR PROGRESS


Lydia Cochran, Turn Back Time, Trail Signage

Lydia created signs to mark our trails. The signs are beautiful and very helpful. This task has been on our Board of Directors’ to-do list for over a year. We have already had families comment on how wonderful the signs are.  Lydia did an amazing job and was completely independent.

VIEW AN EXAMPLE OF HER FINISHED SIGNAGE

VIEW A DETAILED EXPLANATION OF HER WORK PROCESS


Jack Franco, The Collings Foundation

Jack reflects: “My work was to simply just polish and maintain these pieces of history. If no one was maintaining the collection then all the works would fall apart and be forgotten. I am glad I was able to keep history remembered as forgetting it would leave a huge whole in world history that really should never be forgotten. The collection serves as a reminder to the militaristic history of the world and instead of just archiving data, it has actual pieces that you can see and interact with that makes history really come alive and fully impacts you about the people who gave their lives and what they had to go through for their country. I had a lot of fun working for the Collings Foundation, it was truly incredible. Now I can say I am at least a very small part of WW2 history.”


Jose Garcia-Chope, Stephen Roche & Matt Yard, Turn Back Time, Construction

Their Mentor writes: “[They] worked on a project to expand an area of the farm that will be used by families in the future. Their project consisted of building furniture for a park-like area using recycled materials. They did an amazing job and we have already received many comments and compliments on the area. All of the students on this team were very self directed and very creative.”

VIEW THEIR VIDEO REFLECTION


Maya Grant, Edward Street Child Services

VIEW A Q&A FROM MAYA ABOUT THE PROJECT’S IMPACT

VIEW AN ARRAY OF IMAGES FROM HER WORK


Amanda Isak, RIAC

VIEW HER DIGITAL REFLECTION


Alyssa Johnson, Turn Back Time, Preschool Curriculum

Alyssa reflects: “In 2011, Lisa Burris moved her family to a new 58 acre farm in hopes to help two of her children developmentally and emotionally. Originally, Lisa moved her family to help two of her children find their own places, but soon realised that the philosophy she had with her own children, in conjunction with the farm she and her husband Jim had built, could positively impact children and their families in many different ways. Soon, Lisa opened up her gardens, animals, wooded trails, and open fields to the public: creating programs, classes, retreats, and more. Lisa builds off the programs providing, in simplest terms, a philosophy that allows for the exploration of the outside world, as well as to always remember to be respectful, safe, and responsible. Through my Co-Op, I was able to experience life on the farm with energetic and joyful preschoolers, using the skills and ideas I observed them using to create a summer camp activity idea course.”

VIEW HER SUMMER PROGRAM CURRICULUM


Matthew Kuruvilla, UMass Medical, Tobacco Free Partnership

Matt reflects:  “... given my particular interest in the field of public health, I am very grateful that I managed to learn so much about public health on the local level. I believe that I successfully contributed to UMass’ efforts in two critical ways: one, as a youth I am able to provide a unique point of view to meetings and other interactions. For example, when I went to visit the Boston Statehouse to meet with Senators and their aides, I managed to utilize and retell my personal experiences and knowledge on tobacco products in a persuasive manner so that I could encourage others to support the bill that would restrict the purchase of tobacco products. The second way that I helped UMass was through my suggestions for possible outreach such as my interest in starting a chapter of The 84, a youth group that advocates for restriction of tobacco products in Bancroft for years to come.”


Nathaniel Lamptey & Anh Nguyet Phan, WRAP, Children’s Mentoring

VIEW THEIR REFLECTIONS AND PROGRAM EXPANSION SUGGESTIONS


Ben Landry, Preservation Worcester

Ben’s Mentor Writes: “This Place Matters is a program we run annually.  We will use photographs and media coverage to promote re-purposing of Mission Chapel and to highlight the successful restoration of the Fire Alarm & Telegraph Building.  Ben also worked on a brochure of Mechanics Hall that we will distribute at an upcoming event.  All Ben’s work will be useful to our members and the community at large.”

VIEW A PRESENTATION OF THIS PLACE MATTERS

VIEW THE PRESS RELEASE FOR THE EVENT

VIEW THE BROCHURE FOR THE MECHANICS HALL EVENT


Roger Liu & P.J. Mara, The Y – Greendale Branch, Livestrong Data Analysis

Roger and PJ write:  “Here is a work product that we created for the Livestrong program. We were tasked with turning written information digital from the Livestrong program. Next, we organized the data in an Excel document so we could create analytical formulas. Then we found the percent changes for each statistic, which happened to be an increase for every statistic.  We learned how to work independently on a project with very open parameters and honed some data analysis skills that we had gained from our science classes at Bancroft. We completed analysis for both Boroughs and Greendale branches so that they can advertise statistics with their Livestrong program.

VIEW THEIR SUMMARY


Katherine Martineau, Turn Back Time, Construction and Design

VIEW KAT’S JOURNAL


Ailish Mills, The Ecotarium

VIEW HER PRESENTATION OF HOW A SCIENCE DISCOVERY UNIT IS CREATED


Sarah Nano, WRAP, Children’s Programs

Sarah’s activity binder will be used by current and future program coordinators as part of the program’s curriculum. It is also in such a form that new ideas can be added to the binder, making it easier for the program coordinator to run his or her Saturday morning programs. The main purpose in creating such a tool was to make the transition from one coordinator to another a little easier in that there is always a place to turn for program ideas. Sarah has made this possible for WRAP! The Burmese refugee population whom WRAP serves will be able to take part in the activities, games and recipes she has included in the binder, ultimately resulting in a fun Saturday morning.

VIEW SARAH'S ACTIVITY BINDER


Divya Navani, Greater Worcester Land Trust, Photo Archiving

Her Mentor writes: “Without Divya’s help, we would still be hoping to have a large pile of photographs digitized. We now have many of those images online in an organized fashion. The digitization of historic images is very useful for our organization, and something that we do not normally have time to do ourselves.”

VIEW DIVYA’S EXPLANATION OF THE PROJECT


Rose Pellegrini, The Y – Greendale Branch, Marketing

Rose writes:  “What I found refreshing about the women working in the development office at the Y is that they did not stay behind their desks all day; these women were manning the front desk when short staffed, fielding questions for members, cleaning up spills instead of leaving it for maintenance to take care of, and so much more. I believe that this way of functioning shows the true community that the Y upholds, and that everyone helps each other to get the job done. This is also telling of the type of projects as a marketing intern that I was subject to completing.

Some days, I was truly testing my marketing skills by developing flyers and pamphlets to educate members on the programs that the Y offers. Additionally, I was able to get to projects done that had always been pushed to the back-burner, such as the new member welcome email that I composed, as well as an informational flyer stored in the new member welcome folders that lists the programs that tend to fly under the radar at the Y in the hopes to surprise the new members and get the programs’ words out. Other days, I helped in any way that I could to lessen the burden on those working at the Y.”

VIEW ROSE'S INFORMATIONAL FLYER

VIEW HER WELCOME LETTER


Joe Ricca, Regatta Point Community Sailing

Joe writes: “I needed to make a curriculum to teach STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) subjects to kids about middle school aged. Initially I was confused. I was working at a sailing program, not a school. But I wanted to be part of Regatta Point so I began work. Once I started working on the project I began to understand it more. I was to make and organize a curriculum that would teach kids STEM subjects through sailing. ... When I was nearing the end of my time at Regatta, I realized that my little project had a bigger impact on the community than I initially thought. It might help kids in programs at Regatta learn some concepts from school in a more hands-on and creative way while still teaching them sailing. My work helped Regatta Point too, by making everything organized with materials and directions lessons can run much smoother.


Olivia Spagat & Alejandra Williams, Turn Back Time, Gardens

Their Mentor writes: “Olivia and Alejandra worked on a project in the garden. They did a lot of prep for the summer growing season which will help us tremendously throughout our summer camp season. Their big project consisted of building a music wall out of recycled materials. This will be a wonderful experience for our students to enjoy while they are on the farm.

The girls did a wonderful job utilizing the materials provided and problem solving. They also did quite a bit of research for their xylophone.”

VIEW THEIR REFLECTION VIDEO


Liven Teng, Turn Back Time, Farmhand

VIEW HER DAILY WORK JOURNAL


Andrew Turley & Muhammad Yusuf, The Y – Greendale Branch, Relationship Management

VIEW THEIR VIDEO REFLECTION


Alessandra Veinbachs, The Ecotarium

VIEW A SLIDESHOW OF HER REFLECTIONS

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